Instagram

Thursday, 29 December 2016

Creativity

Hi, howdy, hello. I wasn’t planning on uploading a blog post today but something has been playing on my mind and I thought I’d use this space to discuss it. The issue at hand is creativity and the misconceptions that surround it.

I don't believe that creativity and intelligence are antonymous. It takes a complex mind to think outside of the box and people generally underestimate how hard it can be to be creative. I’ve seen many people who are considered to be academics try and apply themselves to creative fields and fail miserably.

I have seen accountants who mock marketers and demean their roles but when asked to create a marketing campaign themselves, produce something that is very literal, unoriginal, two dimensional and quite frankly, boring. They fail to appreciate that creativity requires skill and isn’t just an afterthought.


I find that the general view is that you are either intelligent or you are creative but that’s simply not the case. People who do, what are considered to be, more academic courses are not automatically intelligent and people who do creative courses are not automatically unintelligent. It is possible to be both or neither.


Creativity is a form of intelligence in it's own right and can be applied to much more than just the arts. Creative problem solving and critical thinking alone are highly valuable skills that many employers crave in potential candidates. Creativity can develop a person's intuition and produce innovators. Creativity can make people more resourceful and adaptable. Creativity can be strategic and intentional and informed.


I wish that people would alter their view of what it means to be creative; that teachers, parents and authoritative figures would encourage creativity in youths instead of disregarding it as a useless skill. That they would understand that whilst different roles serve different purposes it doesn't always mean that one offers less value than the other.


It'd do the world a load of good if more people would value creativeness and creatives because at the end of the day creativity is worth it's weight in gold.




SHARE:

6 comments

  1. Very different kind of post from what I've seen in the blogger world in the past few years. Love it. I'm creative naturally and so can kind of agree that creativity can be essentially applied anywhere in life.

    S .x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It absolutely can and it can take on many forms. It's without a shadow of a doubt a valuable attribute to have and not something that is a hindrance.

      Glad you enjoyed the post, it's something I'm very passionate about!

      - A x

      Delete
  2. I definitely feel this, most of my family are very artistic and very maths minded but people don't see the two mixing together at all but they work well. And as I'm doing a physics degree i often see people demean creative things but you need to be creative make new discoveries. I see both sides mocking each other and it all seems so petty and pointless <3

    The Quirky Queer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah I can imagine artistic ability and a mathematical mind working well together. I have a friend who is a chemical engineer who is excellent at drawing and other things. I just wish people would stop limiting others with their preconceived misconceptions and appreciate the fact that having no skills and having different skills are not the same thing.

      - A x

      Delete
  3. Love this post and definitely agree with everything you said. I did a design degree and I've lost count of the number of times that someone joked that my degree wasn't a 'proper degree'! So annoying.

    Rachel | Hey Rachieface

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ugh tell me about it! It's funny though because all the friends I have who have got design degrees (mainly illustration and graphic design) are the only people I know who have gone straight into graduate roles directly in their field of study.

      I know people who have degrees in things like criminology who put down others for not having proper degrees, yet they've ended up in basic retail roles because there's no jobs in criminology.

      So if the purpose of a degree is solely to secure a graduate role then design degrees are most certainly useful, "proper" degrees.

      - A x

      Delete

© Two Different Worlds. All rights reserved.
Blogger templates by pipdig